Tag Archives: removal

Consumer group Choice sounds warning on tattoo removal industry

With tattoo removal fast becoming a huge industry, it’s about time we started hearing warnings about the lack of training required to operate lasers.

The consumer watchdog Choice has sounded a warning over the lack of regulation in the tattoo removal industry, pointing out that no medical training is required for those using lasers to remove unwanted ink from flesh.

Removing tattoos a big step for job hunters

Interesting article, but I’m struggling to figure out how a tattoo on the calf or shoulder of a man would be a barrier to employment. How often do men bear their shoulders and calves while at work?

Luis Orozco had ferocious orange-and-black tigers snarling out from each of his calves.

Juan Velasquez had a massive red, white and blue eagle spread across his shoulder.

Yolanda Carretero had an old English-style “L” and flower on her left hand.

They were among several dozen people who flocked to a low-cost tattoo removal clinic in San Pablo, Calif. recently. Sponsored by the San Pablo Economic Development Corp., the monthly clinic is the first step of the city’s Removing Barriers program that soon will add training on job-readiness and fiscal responsibility.

(NSFW) BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS FIND THE MICHELANGELO OF NIPPLE TATTOOS

Warning: Link contains nudity.

Breast cancer rates have risen in recent decades, and that increase has been especially pronounced in the United States. Currently, one in eight American women will confront the disease in their lifetime. Over the same period of time mortality rates from the disease have declined. For many, treatment will necessitate breast and areola removal. Patients survive the mauling with flat chests bound in dark scars. Most opt for reconstructive surgery. Breast implants can provide the shape of what was lost, but making a realistic-looking areola is a greater challenge.

For all of medicine’s advances, the best option for areola reconstruction is tattooing, and in the field of cosmetic tattooing, Vinnie’s trompe-l’oeil “areola portraits,” as he calls them, are widely regarded as the best that money can buy.

Tattoo removal expert has a warning: Just don’t do it!

Yet another article about tattoo removal where false information is being spread.

Let’s say you are living in the moment, feeling giddy — a little tipsy, maybe — and you decide to go for it. You decide to get that tattoo.

Dr. Suzanne Kilmer has a warning for you: Think twice before acting. Not only do you face five times the risk of contracting hepatitis C, chances are you’ll change your mind about whether you like your tattoo before you reach middle age.

Recent studies have shown a correlation between tattoos and hep C, but also stated that the risks were much lower in a professional shop. The data showed that people with hepatitis were 5x more likely to have tattoos, not the other way around like she stated.

There is also no data to support her statement that “chances are you’ll change your mind about whether you like your tattoo before you reach middle age.”

Movie review: ‘Tattoo Nation’ doc studies art form’s mark on U.S.

The first reviews of  ’Tattoo Nation’ are rolling in:

Decidedly more celebration than exposé, the movie bypasses such practical issues as health risks, tattoo addiction and remorse, and the pain and expense — and increasing popularity — of tattoo removal.

I have not yet seen this movie, so my comments are purely in response to the reviewer. But perhaps the filmmakers decided not to cover a “practical issue” like tattoo remorse because the statistics show a low number of people with tattoos have any remorse. Perhaps they skipped over the issue of health risks because tattoos done in a reputable shop carry very little risk. Maybe they skipped the topic of tattoo addiction because very few people are truly addicted. Or that just simply wasn’t was this movie is about as you can easily learn by reading the synopsis.

SYNOPSIS
Tattoos used to be a sign of rebellion. A middle finger salute to the rest of the world. Outlaw bikers got tattoos. Sailors on leave in Singapore got tattoos. Lifers in the joint got tattoos.

Now, your mother’s got a butterfly on her ankle and your kid’s sporting a tramp stamp.

What happened? How did tattoos go from the renegade, readymade, carney cartoons inked as fast as possible to the art form they’ve become today?

That transformation is the subject of the new documentary film, TATTOO NATION.